July 15, 2015 – Squirrel Mischief

We’ve had a mysterious clothesline change of location. After returning home from vacation, a line that goes from the tree to the clothesline pole was snapped, and the end of the line was about 15 feet up on the opposite side of the tree. Couldn’t quite figure out how it got there – if it snapped, it couldn’t weave its way through the branches up the opposite side of the tree. I tied it back and a few days later saw a squirrel chewing on the rope.

Again, it happened – the line usually goes between the pole and tree.

The line up in the tree, presumably dragged up by the squirrel – for fun or nesting material?

July 10, 2015 – BWCA Excursion – On the Trail and in the Woods

There’s a lot of interesting flora in the wilderness.

lady slipper

Here’s a showy lady slipper, the Minnesota state flower (within a few paces of Emma’s tent to boot).

pin cushion moss

This soft little orb is known as pincushion moss.

sundew

One of the most spectacular plants we encountered was this colony of Sundew growing on a log in Cherokee Creek.

sundew

This is a carnivorous plant. The end of the red hairs on this plant look like little drops of inviting dew. Surprise, if you are an insect looking for a dew drop or bit of nectar. It is sticky and “eats” the insects in the highly acidic, nutrient-deficient bog.

pitcher plant

Another carnivorous plant of the floating bog – the pitcher plant. Named for the inviting entrance that attracts insects and small children (OK, maybe not small children).

The insects slide down, the hairs inside the pitcher facing down, where a reservoir of liquid drowns them since they cannot crawl back out.

woman portaging canoe

Once more sporting the Meadville-Lombard swag, Linda portages the canoe between two lakes.

boy portaging canoe

Martin get in on the action as well. The biggest portaging day was 4 portages totaling about 432 rods, or about 1.25 miles. Yes, that means carrying the canoes, all the food, tents, and equipment for over a mile – over rocks, through mud, up and down hill.


Here we are hiding out in a grove of cedar trees on Sawbill Lake while we waited an hour or so for the lightning to stop. We had originally planned on staying the last night on Sawbill, but the rain, and unsettled weather led us to get out at about 4:00 in the afternoon and power-driving home to avoid the big storms.

We raced the storms out of the BWCA, then also raced the storms in the car from Duluth to Minneapolis.

Finally, the aftermath – getting everything unpacked and dried out before putting it away.

July 10, 2015 – BWCA Excursion – At Camp

This post collects photos from around the campsites.

Emma enjoying the night after arriving at Cherokee Lake.

Mom making pancakes stylin’ her Meadville-Lombard swag (sunglasses).

Plenty of time for hanging out in the hammock gazing at the wilderness.

frost lake

Incredible beach at Frost Lake. Decidedly not frosty on this uncharacteristically hot day. The sand on this beach is a stark contrast to the surrounding rock. Amazingly, you could walk out probably 200 yards or more before it reached four feet deep.

frost lake, frost lake sand beach

The beach with the A+ campsite on the rocky point at the end of the beach. Imagine having this beach all to yourself all day!

Hanging out waiting for dinner.

Martin on KP duty.

The nightly ritual of hanging the food back out of the reach of (most) bears.

young woman around fire

Finally, at the end of the day, some time around the fire.

 

July 9, 2015 – BWCA Excursion – On the Lake

Rather than a day-by-day account of the trip, I thought I’d break it up into themes. First up is “on the lake.”

cherokee creek

The intriguing Cherokee Creek – it narrowed and became more boggy as you approached the portage. Lots of great bog plants along the way.

Sometimes there’s paddling out in the open lake.

Other times it’s more of a river.

Or a narrower river.

cherokee creek

And even places just wide enough for a canoe to pass. (But no matter how narrow, beats carrying the canoe around.)

woman paddling canoe

Another hearty stern paddler.

cherokee lake

Looking south from a campsite perch on the northern edge of Cherokee Lake.

cherokee lake

Looking south from a campsite perch on the southern edge of Cherokee Lake.

July 8, BWCA Excursion – Day Before

Before heading into the wilderness, since it is an eight-hour drive, it’s hard to get an early enough start to the day, so we stayed on the North Shore of Lake Superior the first night. As a bonus we got to have dinner with Claire.

Since we were close to the Temperance River, we took a short hike along the river.

Or in it, as the case may be.

Laughing waters.

June 7, 2015 – Linda Gets “Robed”

Linda wrapped up her two-year internship at the Des Moines UU church this weekend.

Here she debuts her new minister’s robe – a gift from her internship committee.

Speaking of them – here is most of her committee.

Linda with her mentor and colleague-to-be Rev Mark Stringer.

And finally, some old (or shall we say long-time?) friends from the previous ministerial search committee in Ames that came down for the occasion.

June 2, 2015 – Wild Basin Hike

Today it was off to yet another area of the park – Wild Basin.

The trail followed a stream for a good portion of the time.

These bridges were either not washed out or rebuilt from the Sept 2013 floods.

The water really couldn’t decide the best path down the mountain, so it just kind of went every which-way.

This was probably the last day for this little Frosty.

Not many days I’ve hiked through snow and seen a hummingbird!

Unfortunately, even though they are given explicit exemption from domesticated animals on the trail, we did not see any llamas!

Lilly Lake.

The parting group shot!  We left just in time. Three of the next four nights there were tornado watches and 8 inches of rain the following two days after we left, a tornado touchdown nearby, and knee-deep hail in parts of Denver. Just like I brought sunshine to Iceland, I’m evidently a vacation good weather charm at the moment.

June 1, 2015 – Trail Ridge Road

Today was a bit lower-key so we drove the trail ridge road, which has a peak elevation of 12,183 ft above sea level, making it the highest paved road in the U.S.

How’d you like to plow the right lane?

We always told Martin he would get to go places his sisters did not. Well, here’s one!

Even though it is June, the snowpack is still quite impressive along the road.

And even higher near the pass.

Part of the alpine visitor center is dug out – the snow is still up to the roof to the left and right of the entrance.

The building next door was not faring much better – the restaurant and gift shop had only a few opening for some of the windows.

Why they needed an area closed sign down this trail was a bit perplexing!

Marmot!

Near the pass.

Our long-time traveling companions enjoying a warm and bright mountain afternoon.

Back in the lowlands, the elk grazed.

We hiked to within a few miles of the headwaters of the Colorado River.

Mrs. Moose peaking out from the trail along the Colorado River.

May 31, 2015 – Mills Lake Hike

Our first big hike was up to Mills Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park.

The trail started out dry, then as we moved up, a little wet…

and then a little white for much of the way. But the weather was warm and it was shorts weather.

Mills Lake Trail

Around the bend, approaching Mills Lake.

The intrepid hiker nearing the lake.

Boy at mountain lake

Martin with what we call his “outdoor advertisement” look.

Finally at the lake.

Mills Lake

This place was reminiscent of  Moraine Lake in the Canadian Rockies with the numerous peaks surrounding the lake.

Rocky Mountain Peak

A look at one of the peaks on the way back down.

Aspen Leaves

Depending on the elevation the Aspen leaves were out…

Pasque Flowers

or not, but the pasque flowers were.