August 20, 2014 – Reykjanes Peninsula

This area is around the airport, which is about 40 kilometers south of Reykjavík. It appears as a vast wasteland of lava flows from the air, and after leaving the airport, but there are some surprises here and there. Again, I will just put a few photos in the blog post and put a slideshow that can be viewed full screen with many more photos.

At the Seltun geothermal area.  A Yellowstoney-type place with mud pots and steam vents.

Yeah, not the fresh scent that is usually around the country.

Most of Iceland’s power comes from geothermal and hydro power – 85%.  The water in Reykjavik comes directly from the ground and goes through all the houses, offering heating in radiators and hot water. You do not want to turn water on the tap only hot.  It is much hotter than hot water in the U.S.  Even though the outdoor temperature is commonly around 50 degrees F, most houses have their windows open most of the time, as the hot water that  constantly flows through the house, is also virtually free. The downside is there is a sulfur smell to the water.  Cold water is from another source, and is untreated with chemicals.

Here is the place where the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates are spreading apart a few millimeters a year.

Slideshow:
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To see more photos and full screen, use the slide sorter above.